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HYDRO POWER POTENTIAL OF NORTH EAST INDIA AND IT’S DEVELOPMENT

In this modern era of information and electronic technology, power plays a significant role in not only the socio-economic development but also the overall development of human being. All this modern days’ electronic gadgets and equipment which provide information is rely on power. All of them are functioning with the help of power. In brief, it is true that we cannot live without power for a few seconds in one way or other. Unfortunately even after 70 years of independence, our country in general and states of north east India in particular such important infrastructure is still unable to fulfil the requirement in spite of having huge power potential especially hydro power is concern. It is a great issue which all of us have to think seriously. On the other hand, North eastern region of India occupies the major share of having hydro power and thermal power potential among the other regions of the country. The present paper is highlighted onthree main parts. The first part is discussing on the potentialities of Indian hydro power resources in global context, present status, power projection for the future through different plan period and contribution of North Eastern Region to Indian total hydro power potential. The second part is critically examining the potentialities of hydro power in North Eastern Region through state-wise potential, power projects in operation and projects under constructions. Finally, it is devoted to suggestions and conclusion of the study in the wake of the government of India’s Act East Policy.

When our country attained Independence, we did not have sufficient electricity to light up our homes. The iconic lantern and oil lamp were the only sources of light for all of us after getting dark. The oil lamp lit and placed at a window served as guiding torch for travellers or those yet to come back home late night. Today after 70 years of independence, the situation has become much brighter. Electricity has reached most households of both urban and rural areas. According to government report, out of 18,452 villages in the country 14,483 villages have been electrified so far. The electrification work is in progress on 2,981 villages while 988 villages are uninhabited. The government has said it aims to provide electricity to all homes by December 2018, with a target of reaching power to all un-electrified villages by the end of December 2018.

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Fighting Corruption or Vindictive Politics?

During its election campaign in Manipur in the early part of 2017, BJP swore to fix accountability for the gross misrule perpetuated in the border state by the Congress, tagging then Chief Minister, Okram Ibobi Singh as the 20 percent CM alleging, he takes that much commission for each and every developmental projects executed in the state during his 15 year rule of Manipur as the Congress’ Chief Minister since 2002. 

Seven months after assuming power, on September 2nd, the BJP led N Biren Singh government registered an FIR for offences of cheating, criminal conspiracy and breach of trust against the former Chief Minister, Okram Ibobi Singh and three former chief secretaries, DS Poonia, PC Lawmkunga and O Nabakishore Singh in a case pertaining to financial irregularities in managing Manipur’s premier construction and employment generating agency, Manipur Development Society, MDS. The misappropriation amounts to Rs.185.79 crore and it is hashtagged as MDS scam now. The FIR came after the state’s Vigilance Department submitted its inquiry report on financial irregularities of MDS acting on a complaint filed by the Planning Department in November 2016.

Others named in the scam are MDS’s former Project Director, Yambem Ningthem Singh and the agency’s Administrative Officer, S Ranjit Singh.

According to the State Vigilance Commission inquiry report, the officials and staff of MDS flaunted established procedures, norms and rules particularly while awarding contract works to agencies and caused a financial liability to the tune of Rs 185.79 crores.

Police source said the FIR lodged would help in establishing how and who were responsible for the procedural lapses, mismanagement, misappropriation and misuse of public fund. Police suspects Yambem Ningthem as responsible for concealing missing documents that the Vigilance inquiry reported in the case of MBs, DPRs, sanction papers of MDS. It is under Ningthem’s tenure as Project Director that the police are investigating for financial irregularities.

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4th Female Minister in 30 long years 

Mizoram decided to induct a woman minister in the state cabinet, at a time when political parties are working to pass the Women’s Reservation Bill in Parliament to make it mandatory to reserve 33 per cent of seats for women in the Lok Sabha and the State Legislative Assemblies.

The decision to have a woman minister in the state cabinet is historic as Mizoram got its fourth female Legislator after a gap of 30 years. Lalawmpuii Chawngthu a 35 year spinster became the fourth woman in Mizoram to be inducted in the state’s council of ministers since 1987. Lalawmpuii is the daughter of senior Congress leader C. Chawngkunga. She has been active in politics since last 10 years. Governor Lt Gen (Retd) Nirbhay Sharma administered the oath of office to Chawngthu at a function in the Raj Bhavan. Chawngthu, President of the Mizoram Pradesh Youth Congress Committee was elected from Hrangturzo seat in Central Serchhip District in a byelection by a margin of 2,503 votes against her lone rival, Lalduhawma, of the eight-party combine United Democratic Front (UDF). Thanga and Chawngthu were inducted in the council of ministers following the resignation of Labour Minister Lalrinmawia Ralte and Fisheries Minister Buddha Dhan Chakma.

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Indian of North Eastern Origin

What does it feel like to share a national life along with those who do not share the same history? If history forms the foundation of our aspirations, looking to a future together is even tougher. Being a North-Easterner in India is more than just belonging to a different sphere within the contemporary national geography. Historical aloofness is the toughest of realities. Our history has shrunk down to an almost academic nonentity. Northeast history makes no sound in the noisy narratives of “mainstream history”. The rigorous interpretation and reinterpretation of history by the contemporary political ideologues is a new national passion. Every vestige of a particular era is brandished as the final proof of what actual India was like. The redefining of India goes on. One wonders that, if the definition of true India and by the same token, a true Indian, is carried out based on the colour and tone of a particular ancient culture, how many ethnic groups in India would actually qualify to be Indians. Even as we wish to get ahead in time, our cultural genes are being taken back in time for validation of their originality in terms of Indianness.

Recently I came to realize that there is now a categorization of Northeast Indians versus Desi Indians. I was more appalled than intrigued by the categorization. The term “desi” in British India times used to be applied to people from the Indian-subcontinent to distinguish them from Westerners. It alluded to being an original inhabitant of the land as opposed to those who came as colonialists. That was sort of the political implication of the term in those days. And it had a tremendous implication in the context of Indian Nationalism that was born against the backdrop of British colonialism. Now semantically, desi means “of the country”. There is also a subtle connotation of “the culture of the land of India”. There may be, perhaps, no ploy to render the Northeast people “non-desi” meaning “not of the land of India”. However, the fact that such a categorization happens so naturally, even without actually thinking it through, bares an underlying mindset that persists among Indians in general.

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Amarjit Singh Khiyam WORLD CUP 2017 U-17 CAPTAIN

Amarjit Singh Khiyam from Manipur recently was elected as the captain for the U-17 FIFA World Cup. Young Amarjit was chosen as the captain by his teammates through a process of secret ballot that was engineered by the Portuguese coach Luis Norton de Matos. This will be the first FIFA tournament hosted by the country.

His father Chandra Mani Singh Kiyam a small time farmer and a part time carpenter believed that his son can carry the weight of responsibility in this prestigious sporting event. Born and brought up in Manipur Amarjit’s introduction to the beautiful game came through his uncle when he introduced him to the Chandigarh Football Academy. When the selectors were hunting for players to represent India at the Under-17 World Cup, Amarjit was invited for trials and he caught the eye of everyone. At first he was slotted with the reserve side and made the first team grade after German coach Nicolai Adam was impressed with his abilities in midfield. Young Amarjit, who has represented India in the age group teams on 29 occasions, is the joint most experienced player at the camp alongside Komal Thatal, the only Indian to score against a Brazilian national team. With this responsibility Amarjit is keen on fulfilling his father’s dream of seeing the national jersey for the senior team as well.

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